I have no idea what to say...

theswinginsixties:

The Hollies, 1967.

superseventies:

Fleetwood Mac: Stevie Nicks and Bob Welch on stage.

lascasartoris:

Easter Sunday (top-bottom)

  1. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  2. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  3. Harlem 1943 by Weegee
  4. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  5. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  6. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  7. South Side, Chicago,. 1941 by Edwin Rosskam
  8. Harlem 1940 by Weegee
  9. Harlem 1955 by William Klein
  10. Harlem (W. 117th St. and Seventh Ave) 1939

haroldlloyds:

Happy Birthday Harold Clayton Lloyd, Sr. 
April 20, 1893 - March 8, 1971

"Harold Lloyd was one of the most charismatic innovators of film comedy, an excellent actor, and a consummate filmmaker." - Jack Lemmon

Harold Lloyd was, and remains, one of the most iconic figures in film history. His films influenced genres, styles and techniques that are still very much alive today. His comedic genius and timing redefined the genre of film comedy, and gave life to many sub-genres including the romantic comedy, the college comedy and the football movie. Character minded, and technically adept, his films were filled with joy, heartbreak, action, social comment, stunts and most of all the roaring spirit of the 1920s. They are still as endearing and hilarious today as they were when they came out, over 80 years ago. Lloyd was truly a genius, operating at the same level as his contemporaries, Chaplin and Keaton, and offered an alternative to the ‘grotesque’ comedy character. Lloyd’s Glass character was the boy-next-door, the average american go-getter, a character so normal that anyone could identify with him. He was The Boy. 

Lloyd’s legacy has been criminally underrepresented in the annals of film history, and it’s about time he made a return to public consciousness. He was so much more than a pair of glasses. He was the living embodiment of the spirit of 1920s America, and truly a master of cinema. 

eightiesredux:

Prince - ‘I Would Die 4 U’

tracylord:

Myrna Loy + nose scrunch

At the beginning of her career Myrna Loy´s turned-up nose was not as famous yet, rather infamous. She had a little bone on the side of her nose, which cast a shadow in certain lights. This drove the cameramen crazy "because they never knew when it would appear. They’d see the rushes, groan, ‘There’s that thing again,’ and have to retake the scene. It looked like a tiny smudge on my nose. I mean you could hardly see it, but that’s how far the mania for perfection went." So she was often called in for retakes and since those are rather expensive she was once called in by the makeup department who announced that they maybe would fix her nose. "I was horrified. I used to be known as ‘The Nose’ for goodness’ sake—thousands of women went to plastic surgeons to have it duplicated.  I said, ‘Never! Nobody’s touching this nose!’ and got out of there fast.” And she was true. She had the most famous and sought-after nose of the 1930s and women would regularly go to plastic surgeons go get “a nose like Myrna Loy”.

theswinginsixties:

Barbra Streisand

Sunset Blvd (1950)

theswinginsixties:

David Bowie, 1967

Gooble Gobble, Gooble Gobble………………………. “Freaks” (1932) dir. by Tod Browning

superseventies:

David Bowie, 1977.

1920s Dresses (via)

superseventies:

Gene Simmons on stage.

Happy Birthday Marlon Brando

(April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004)